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Category Archive for ‘Non-Fiction’ rss

Non-Fiction

Better Left Unseen: Justice League of America

With all of the weak pilots that make it to series on television *cough*BionicWoman*cough* have you ever wondered about the shows that didn’t make it?

Now that Time Warner/DC are trying to revitalize their comic book properties into successful film franchises, with talk of Batman vs. Superman and an ever-changing Justice League movie in various stages of development hell, I’m sure they would prefer if everyone forgot about their ill-fated 1997 pilot for Justice League of America. But like George Lucas and his legendary Star Wars Holiday Special, it’s hard to bury something this bad for long–the stink leads people right to it.

Non-Fiction

Entertainment News: Hollywood Feminism, Paul Cornell

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Non-Fiction

Please Take Our Survey

It’s been over a month since we rolled out the new Fantasy magazine look and introduced more types of content. We’re interested in how well this works for you, our readers, and ways we can improve. You are what drives this magazine, after all. So please fill out this survey. It’s only 10 questions and shouldn’t take very long.

Non-Fiction

Movie News: No Catwoman Cher, “The Fly” Opera, SF Summer Movie Roundup

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Non-Fiction

Geek Flashback: Exo-Squad

These days most television viewers are familiar with the concept of shows with a plot arc running over an entire season or series, but in the early 1990s, this was rarely done–and almost never done in animation. Just as Babylon 5 preceded the trend to longer, more complex story lines in live action drama, a little known series called Exo-Squad emerged as an ambitious science fiction cartoon with a plot more challenging than your average Saturday morning fare.

Exo-Squad premiered in September of 1993, just edging ahead of Disney’s Gargoyles a year later, and broke the norm of cartoons that “reset” at the end of a 22-minute episode. Following the Able Squad, a team of Terrans armed with exoskeletons fighting in a way against the genetically engineered Neosapiens, the show featured a continuing storyline and complex character development, and tackled a variety of issues and themes in ways only science fiction can. Touted as the “American anime” in a time where access to Japanese animation was somewhat limited, this was simply one of the best cartoons on television–so it’s no surprise that it was canceled after only two seasons.

Non-Fiction

Television News: Pushing Daisies Tour, Middleman Hiatus, True Blood Scoop

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Non-Fiction

Guest Column: Saaaay… Why AREN’T there brown elves?

A few weeks ago during Fantasy’s Blog For A Beer on racism in the genre, we talked about using fantastic or SFnal elements as allegories to explore prejudice and -isms. My initial reaction to this is noted in the thread–mainly that I don’t think allegory is sufficient for exploring these issues anymore. But my secondary reaction is kind of tangential: why are we using elves as an allegory for skin color issues? Why the heck don’t elves have varied colors themselves?

Non-Fiction

Around the Blogosphere: Podcastle Reviews, KGB Photos, What’s Wrong with Steampunk

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Non-Fiction

No Objectivity: Copperhead

Well, the time has come for me to face another battle with the Sci-Fi Channel. This time, their weapon is an army of horrible CGI copperhead snakes speeding across the open West. My weapon is the candlestick, in the library.

We open with a man on a horse! This is a good sign; forty-five seconds into the movie without something stupid happening. Just a man on a horse. Maybe this will be a really minimalist Western that brings forth ideas of the individual versus nature!

Oh, nope, that was a fleeting dream. Our Hero comes across some overturned wagons and their hella-dead former occupants. (They’re brown people! We won’t be seeing them again, so you should just get excited about it right now.)

“La serpienta,” one croaks upon seeing Our Hero.

Non-Fiction

The Objectification of Women in Comic Books

A handsome intelligence officer of the United States Army, Colonel Steve Trevor, crashes his plane on “Paradise Island” (an island full of Amazon women, what else would it be called, right?). Trevor is found by a beautiful Amazon Princess named Diana, who nurses him and subsequently falls in Love with him. When she learns about the war against the Nazis, she dons a costume of America’s red, white, and blue, and departs for the “Man’s World.” She is Wonder Woman — “beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, stronger than Hercules, and swifter than Mercury”. She can fly like Superman, she can hurl heavy objects like the Hulk, and if you really make her mad, she’ll crack out her golden lasso and tie you up (especially if you’re male).

At first glance, she may look like an empowered, kick-butt, feminist super-heroine amidst a realm dominated by male super-heros. But is Wonder Woman really empowered? Is she really the icon of feminism in graphic novels? Is her message really all about defending sisterhood, freedom, and democracy?