From Modern Mythcraft to Magical Surrealism

Category Archive for ‘Non-Fiction’ rss

Non-Fiction

The Way-Not-Determined: Monica Byrne

To me, that’s what the missing finger is. It’s the way-not-determined. Alba sees nine visions of the future in which, despite having (literally) won the lottery, she’s still trapped.

Non-Fiction

Films of High Adventure: Time Ba–um hey actually The Chronicles of Narnia

I know this is supposed to be about the film and not the books, but they’re pretty much the same for me, and ok you know what? I’m merely setting up the unbelievable amount of slack I’m about to cut this low-budget, badly-acted nightmare of an adaptation.

Non-Fiction

Author Spotlight: Joseph F. Nacino

Normally, I have a writing exercise that involves timing myself to write within a 15-minute period which is perfect if I want to flesh out a particular concept. But this time, because I was feeling particularly inspired with the idea, I extended my 15-minutes to give birth to the vignette, “The Word-Eater Falls in Love.”

Non-Fiction

Author Spotlight: Silvia Moreno-Garcia

When you are growing up poor, with no prospects, you’re spraying graffiti on the walls, not considering a degree in art. There’s even a certain innocence in the malice.

Non-Fiction

A Conversation with Mary Robinette Kowal, Author of Shades of Milk and Honey

A Conversation with Mary Robinette Kowal, author of Shades of Milk and Honey.

Non-Fiction

Dreadnought by Cherie Priest

Yes, Boneshaker fans, the zombies are back in Dreadnought, the sequel to the award-winning first novel in Cherie Priest’s steampunk/Weird Western “Clockwork Century” series. In her new outing, Priest emphasizes the Wild West and Civil War aspects of her alternate history. She introduces an interesting new cast and a strong, likeable new protagonist, deferring the return of Boneshaker characters to the denouement. Priest also wisely saves the zombie-fighting for Dreadnought‘s climax.

Non-Fiction

Aidan Doyle: Children Sometimes Notice Things That Adults Don’t

Cherry blossoms have a special place in Japanese culture. They mark the arrival of spring and as the blossoms only last a couple of weeks, they came to represent the transience of beauty.

Non-Fiction

The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack by Mark Hodder

The plot synopsis may sound rather strange, but rest assured: it doesn’t begin to capture the wild delights of The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack. Debut novelist Mark Hodder outrageously reinvents both Victorian England and pulp fiction in the guise of a complicated time-travel novel. The narrative’s darkly fun tone becomes decidedly unfun when the increasingly deranged time traveler attempts serial rape. Which brings us to the female characters: unreconstructed victims and helpmeets who barely partake in the revisionist-pulp action.

Non-Fiction

Moonshine by Alaya Johnson

Urban fantasy is busting out of its contemporary settings, and Alaya Johnson’s cleverly titled novel, Moonshine, is set in a time and place—Jazz Age Manhattan—that seems especially well suited to nocturnal paranormal adventures. Johnson makes the most of the re-imagined era with her thoughtfully developed alternate history, and adorns it with period details that reach considerably beyond the Charleston and the bob. She also doesn’t shy away from the era’s less-than-enlightened views on gender, race, class, and immigration.

Non-Fiction

Disastrous Genre Theme Parks

Disneyland will be updating their Star Wars ride, and Universal Studios has recently opened an entire Harry Potter-themed area in addition to their Terminator, Jurassic Park, Scorpion King and Spiderman rides, to name a few. From Tomorrow Land to the Creation Museum, Fantasy and Science Fiction have proven excellent sources for the special effects, the futuristic or fantastical backdrops, and the sense of adventure that fill children and adults alike with sensawunda and “what if”, regardless of whether they are genre fans or not.