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Oct. 2014 (Issue 58)

Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original fantasy (edited by long-time FANTASY editor Cat Rambo) by Kate Hall, H.E. Roulo, T. Kingfisher, and Julia August. Reprints (selected by legendary editor Terri Windling) by Delia Sherman, Emma Bull, Carol Emshwiller, and Nalo Hopkinson. Nonfiction articles (edited by LIGHTSPEED managing editor Wendy N. Wagner) by Kameron Hurley, Galen Dara, Sandra Wickham, Shanna Germain, Sofia Samatar, Kat Howard, and Wendy N. Wagner. Plus an original cover illustration by Elizabeth Leggett.

In This Issue: Oct. 2014 (Issue 58)

Nonfiction

Preface

Welcome to issue fifty-eight of FANTASY MAGAZINE! Over at LIGHTSPEED we were excited to publish our special issue, Women Destroy Science Fiction!, in June, but when our Kickstarter’s tremendous success unlocked all of our stretch goals—thus offering us the chance to expand the destruction into fantasy and horror—we knew that the Women Destroy Fantasy! special issue had to be a FANTASY MAGAZINE special issue.

Nonfiction

Editorial, October 2014

Here’s the thing. All humans live inside a vast structure made of the flow of power and resources. All around us are the things that have grown to shape and express those flows: conventions and laws and manners and pop culture and highbrow art, architecture, religion, literature . . . even genre fiction.

Fiction

The Scrimshaw and the Scream

The morning after she lost her art, Felicity sat at her speckled mirror, inspecting the glossy, gray-white feathers covering her cheeks and forehead.

Nonfiction

Artist Spotlight: Women in Fantasy Illustration Roundtable

A roundtable interview with women artists (and one art director) Julie Bell, Irene Gallo, Rebecca Guay, Lauren Panepinto, Julie Dillon, Elizabeth Leggett, and Zoë Robinson.

Nonfiction

Editorial, October 2014

Here’s the thing. All humans live inside a vast structure made of the flow of power and resources. All around us are the things that have grown to shape and express those flows: conventions and laws and manners and pop culture and highbrow art, architecture, religion, literature . . . even genre fiction.

Nonfiction

Preface

Welcome to issue fifty-eight of FANTASY MAGAZINE! Over at LIGHTSPEED we were excited to publish our special issue, Women Destroy Science Fiction!, in June, but when our Kickstarter’s tremendous success unlocked all of our stretch goals—thus offering us the chance to expand the destruction into fantasy and horror—we knew that the Women Destroy Fantasy! special issue had to be a FANTASY MAGAZINE special issue.

Fiction

Miss Carstairs and the Merman

The night Miss Carstairs first saw the merman, there was a great storm along the Massachusetts coast. Down in the harbor town, old men sat in taverns drinking hot rum and cocking their ears at the wind whining and whistling in the chimneys.

Nonfiction

The Princess and the Witch

Once upon a time, there was a woman who told stories. Stories of witches and of princesses and of choosing true love. Stories that began once upon a time, and ended in happily ever after. You think you know what these stories are, and oh, perhaps you do. But until this woman, until Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy, the stories were not yet called what they are now. But she wrote these stories, and she gave them their name—contes des fées. Fairy tales.

Fiction

The Dryad’s Shoe

Once upon a time, in a land near and far away, there was a girl whose mother died when she was young.

Nonfiction

Language and Imaginative Resistance in Epic Fantasy

Our view of the world, and reality, is a constructed one. Our brains—in their unending quest to be more efficient—often pull on early images and memories to construct our view of the real world. After all, what other information do we have to achieve this but those early stories about how the world is, how it works?

Fiction

The Glass Bottle Trick

The air was full of storms, but they refused to break. In the wicker rocking chair on the front verandah, Beatrice flexed her bare feet against the wooden slat floor, rocking slowly back and forth.

Nonfiction

Women Destroy Urban Fantasy: An Interview with Carrie Vaughn and Kelley Armstrong

It’s so ironic that you’ll hear people talk in one breath about how women are better at writing fantasy and men are better at science fiction, and in the next breath talk about how of course men write better epic fantasy, and women really only write that “girly” fantasy. There are some folks who’d squeeze us out entirely if they could.