From Modern Mythcraft to Magical Surrealism

CHOSEN ONES

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Author Spotlights

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Joe R. Lansdale

Write for yourself, write like everyone you know is dead. Then when you finish you can worry about who might like it.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Nike Sulway

You can’t hope to get a whole person on the page—other people are always the biggest mystery, the great unknowable in life—but you can sometimes get down in words that thing that makes them strange and alluring.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Ellen Kushner

It’s the book we all loved in high school (or college), the one we weren’t sure we should admit to our friends we loved—until we found out they loved it, too. It’s the one with the trashy cover that turns out to be amazingly great.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Lavie Tidhar

In a way, of course, I’m appropriating everything. I’m borrowing this very American mode—the Western—and Niven’s magic system, and I’m setting it in a sort of Victorian-era China dealing with foreign incursions.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Theodora Goss

I struggled at first, because I couldn’t find the right voice to write it in. But then I thought of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, that sort of nostalgic tone, and I wrote in that sort of voice.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: K.M. Ferebee

I don’t believe that pain is something extrinsic to goodness. I believe there can be goodness in suffering, but that this does not mean suffering itself is good.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Charles De Lint

I’d argue that’s the basis for all good fantasy stories: Ground the reader in the familiar so that when you do bring more improbable elements on stage, they’re more readily accepted.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Kristine Kathryn Rusch

I have many friends in the FBI (that makes my old hippie self shudder) and lots and lots of friends in the legal community. So law enforcement stuff is almost as natural as breathing to me.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Nadia Bulkin

I think monsters serve as a means of social control, representative of both unsavory behaviors and unsavory punishments. Then there’s also the need we have for an “other” to define ourselves against.

Nonfiction

Author Spotlight: Tim Pratt

I’m not sure why the protagonist ended up being such a miserable bastard. Perhaps because miserable bastards need magical beaches the most.