From Modern Mythcraft to Magical Surrealism

TheStoneRoad_FantasyMagAd728x90v1_1

Advertisement

Apr. 2022 (Issue 78)

In the April issue of Fantasy Magazine…

Short stories by Hannah Yang (“How to Make a Man Love You”) and Kristina Ten (“Beginnings”); flash fiction by Martins Deep (“Isio”) and Rachel Matuch (“Practical Childcare Considerations for Knights Errant”); poetry by May Chong (“Great Sage, Protector of Horses”) and Laura Ruby (“Alice is Much Farther Than She Appears”); and an essay by Priya Chand.

In This Issue: Apr. 2022 (Issue 78)

Nonfiction

Editorial: April 2022

In this issue’s short fiction, Hannah Yang takes a different kind of look at the magic of love in “How To Make A Man Love You,” and in Kristina Ten’s “Beginnings” we get a new twist on “once upon a time;” in flash fiction, Martins Deep plays with format, imagery, and emotion with “Isio,” and  fantasy meets reality in “Practical Childcare Considerations for Knights Errant” by Rachel Locascio; for poetry, we have “Great Sage, Protector of Horses” by May Chong and “Alice Is Much Farther Than She Appears” by Laura Ruby. Plus essay “Stereotypes, Godhood, and The Wicked + The Divine” by Priya Chand. Enjoy!

Flash Fiction

isio

it is a windless evening in april/ & night drinks my exhalations /in my palms are corpses of fireflies as i sprawl/ here, my aching back reclined /on the breast/ of a half-timbered wall/ above me, the glorious reincarnations of fireflies /mostly with autopsy reports/ “a child’s curiosity” / to steal into a child’s body/ is to be granted magic/ to breathe in wonder/ it is to want eyes /that mirror gods too perfectly, they flutter by, in bodies of/ butterflies calling you by your poison /beyond the cliff

Nonfiction

Editorial: April 2022

In this issue’s short fiction, Hannah Yang takes a different kind of look at the magic of love in “How To Make A Man Love You,” and in Kristina Ten’s “Beginnings” we get a new twist on “once upon a time;” in flash fiction, Martins Deep plays with format, imagery, and emotion with “Isio,” and  fantasy meets reality in “Practical Childcare Considerations for Knights Errant” by Rachel Locascio; for poetry, we have “Great Sage, Protector of Horses” by May Chong and “Alice Is Much Farther Than She Appears” by Laura Ruby. Plus essay “Stereotypes, Godhood, and The Wicked + The Divine” by Priya Chand. Enjoy!

Fiction

How to Make a Man Love You

Zayyan meets Cecilia on the first day of freshman year. He does not believe in love at first sight, but he does believe in the scientific method, and what is this moment if not empirical evidence of the former? She is like no one he has met before. Black hair pulled into a messy bun, bare arms laden with books, brown eyes ardent as a summer storm.

Poetry

Great Sage, Protector of Horses

Handsome Monkey King, Great Sage / Equal to Heaven, we appeal / with dusty knees and shoulders / aching to match our hearts.

Nonfiction

Flash Fiction

Practical Childcare Considerations for Knights Errant

We were at the mouth of the cave, peering into the darkness that glimmered faintly with the gold of the dragon’s hoard, when my phone buzzed. I pulled it out of my leather satchel just far enough to see that it was, in fact, the daycare. My heart sank.

Poetry

Alice is Much Farther Than She Appears

you don’t paint but still find / yourself with loaded brush, / limning a creek from memory, / a place you played as a child, / a weeping tree

Author Spotlight

Fiction

Beginnings

In the beginning, June and Nat are best friends. June is not yet a swarm of honeybees and Nat is not yet a cloud of horseflies, and the king hasn’t yet decided that separating them into parts like this—June’s left pinky finger one bee, her left ring finger another—is the only surefire way to strip them of what they really are. Which, at least in the beginning, is best friends, living together on the outskirts of town, sharing a dresser full of secondhand band tees, squeezing lemon juice onto one another’s hair in the summer, then sitting together on the blacktop to wait.

Nonfiction

Stereotypes, Godhood, and The Wicked + The Divine

(Note: this essay contains major spoilers for The Wicked + The Divine.) I am a first-generation Indian-American. I did well in school. I am a “model citizen,” not even a current speeding ticket on my record. In The Wicked + The Divine (WicDiv) by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie, every 90 years, twelve young adults are told they’re gods from various pantheons. They will be loved. They will be hated. They will be brilliant.