From Modern Mythcraft to Magical Surrealism

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Mar. 2022 (Issue 77)

In the March issue of Fantasy Magazine . . .

Short stories by Isabel J. Kim (“Christopher Mills, Return to Sender”) and Gabrielle Harbowey (“The Dybbuk Ward”); flash fiction by Marie H. Lewis (“I Have Reached into the Basket”) and Lisa M. Bradley (“Collecting Ynes”); poetry by  Alex Jennings (“Negative Detection”) and Cislyn Smith (“Stilling”); and Arley interviews author Rebecca Roanhorse.

In This Issue: Mar. 2022 (Issue 77)

Nonfiction

Editorial: March 2022

In this issue’s short fiction, Isabel J. Kim gives us a necromancer out for justice for her murdered brother in “Christopher Mills, Return to Sender,” and Gabrielle Harbowy takes us inside “The Dybbuk Ward”; in flash fiction, Marie H. Lewis  re-examines Persephone’s fate in “I Have Reached Into The Quantum Basket,” and Lisa M. Bradley’s “Collecting Ynes” is a mythologized account of Ynes Mexia, a Mexican-American woman who experienced mental illness, and who eventually became a world-renowned botanist – without a degree; for poetry, we have “Negative Detection” by Alex Jennings and “Stilling” by Cislyn Smith. Plus an interview with award-winning author of the Sixth World series, Race to the Sun, Black Sun and Fevered Star, and much more, Rebecca Roanhorse. Enjoy!

Flash Fiction

I Have Reached Into the Quantum Basket

I HAVE REACHED INTO THE (Quantum) BASKET, SEEN THE THINGS SHOWN, HEARD THE THINGS SAID, KNOWN THE THINGS DONE. (Declaration of Initiates)

Nonfiction

Editorial: March 2022

In this issue’s short fiction, Isabel J. Kim gives us a necromancer out for justice for her murdered brother in “Christopher Mills, Return to Sender,” and Gabrielle Harbowy takes us inside “The Dybbuk Ward”; in flash fiction, Marie H. Lewis  re-examines Persephone’s fate in “I Have Reached Into The Quantum Basket,” and Lisa M. Bradley’s “Collecting Ynes” is a mythologized account of Ynes Mexia, a Mexican-American woman who experienced mental illness, and who eventually became a world-renowned botanist – without a degree; for poetry, we have “Negative Detection” by Alex Jennings and “Stilling” by Cislyn Smith. Plus an interview with award-winning author of the Sixth World series, Race to the Sun, Black Sun and Fevered Star, and much more, Rebecca Roanhorse. Enjoy!

Poetry

Negative Detection

Some days I wake too early / Eyes like hardboiled eggs / All of me borrowed / Blood beating in my ears / Limbs arranged in a / Semaphore of loneliness.

Fiction

Christopher Mills, Return to Sender

This is the dead thing becoming the body. This is the dead thing opening the body’s eyes. This is the dead thing rising from the grave. This is the dead thing saying “What the hell—I didn’t ask to be summoned. I was having a great time being dead and dreaming about nothing.”

Author Spotlight

Flash Fiction

Collecting Ynes

Ynes doesn’t remember the marigold, but she has a recurring dream in which she accidentally swallows an entire tangerine. She grows very warm and realizes it was not a tangerine at all but a small sun. She knows if she tells her mother what she swallowed, there will be a panic. So instead, she keeps her mouth shut. The sun sits warm in her belly and shines tendrils of light down her arms and legs. When rays escape her fingertips, she puts on mittens.

Poetry

Stilling

Her grandchildren are little greygreen screefalls of tumbling action / tumbling up over her shoulders in the moonlight / just to fling themselves down her incline, down the long hill

Fiction

The Dybbuk Ward

I am not an illness. I’m a soul with a goal. Everyone on this floor is here for intrusive thoughts, ideations, risk of harm to themselves or others. What society used to call possession, they now call neurotransmitter imbalance or schizophrenia or obsessive compulsion.

Nonfiction

Interview: Rebecca Roanhorse

Creativity is fragile. You can’t let many voices in because there’s always plenty of people who want to tear you down, not realizing your harshest critic is yourself. Or at least it is for me. So while I do sometimes read early reviews, I tend not to read anything about my work after it’s been released. It’s already gone through editors and a critique group and many, many drafts. And no work will ever be perfect or please everyone. It can only capture a moment in time for the author – who they were and what concerned then when they wrote it – and then we move on to what’s next.

Author Spotlight